Patents

(2330.04) Course
Instructor(s): Professor I. Mgbeoji

Description: This course deals with the law of patents in Canada. Patent law is one of the main headings of intellectual property law (along with copyrights and trademarks); trade secrets arise from a combination of contracts, equity and property law. The regime of patents protects inventions by granting inventors a limited monopoly of twenty years in exchange for disclosing the invention to society. The essential justification of the patent system is that it enables and rewards innovation. Arguments may also be made that patents afford a secure means by which inventions may be put to commercial use by investors. The course will examine the statutory basis of patent law in Canada, the judicial construction and interpretation of both primary and subsidiary regulations of Canadian patent law. The course will also locate developments in Canadian patent law in the context of international and regional transformations in the field. In this context, the course will explore contemporary controversies over the expansion of patent rights in biotechnology (from patenting mousetraps to patenting mice), and the shift from copyright protection to patent protection for computer programs. It is expected that at the end course, students would have a solid understanding of Canadian patent law as well as how international developments shape and influence Canadian patent law.

Evaluation: Open-book examination (100%).  Students may also opt to write an optional paper, worth 40% of their overall final grade (length, topic and schedule to be determined and approved with the instructor).  Exams for students electing this 40% paper option will be worth 60% of their overall final grade.  This optional paper will not be eligible for the upper year writing requirement.







Fall: 4 credits; 4 hours
Max. Enrollment: 80
Prerequisite Courses: None
Preferred Courses: None
Presentation: Lectures, discussion
Upper Year Research & Writing Requirement: No
Praxicum: No